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South Florida is known for abundant sunshine all year long. While our winter season is very popular with retirees and vacationers from the north, it is also very crowded.  Fall happens to be a wonderful season to visit the Big Cypress Reservation and the Florida Everglades.  Noticeable changes in the air and color of the leaves, the seasonal changes in the Everglades mean variation in wildlife activity and water levels. There are some benefits of taking a Florida Everglades trip in the fall months, and here’s why: 1. The Weather As the sunshine state, it’s no surprise that South Florida temperatures can get hot most of the year. However, fall in South Florida means temperatures drop a few degrees, making conditions in our Everglades setting a little more comfortable – especially for those who aren’t used to the heat like South Florida natives. The lower temperatures are usually accompanied by an enjoyable

During the 20th Century, the United States was home to an estimated 50 million indigenous people. In the early 16th century, approximately 200,000 Natives were living in Florida specifically, a number that today has dwindled nearly tri-fold due to widespread disease, enslavement and war. The powerful journey of Native Americans has been one of resilience and prosperity, and one that eventually led to the creation of the Florida Seminole Tribe. Still, many Americans have yet to discover the rich culture and powerful history that surrounds the Seminoles and their journey into Big Cypress Reservation in the Florida Everglades. Seminoles Then The Seminoles are considered part of the Five Civilized Tribes, dubbed so by early Anglo-European settlers- along with the Cherokee, Chickasaw, Choctaw and Creek tribes. During the 17th and 18th centuries, long before the Seminole tribe was formed, Native American populations shrank due to disease, slavery and murder brought on by

Many exciting changes are underway at the Ah-Tah-Thi-Ki Museum! In addition to our new THPO office building and our Museum re-design, we are also going green. Very green! Upgrading to Green We are doing our part to help conserve the world’s resources. We have eliminated the use of paper plates, plastic silverware, paper cups, and regular cleaning products, and changed to LED lighting, automatic flush toilets, and more. Staff members have been issued water bottles for daily, reusable use. Water coolers, water bottle fillers, and water fountains have been installed and strategically located throughout our facilities to serve both our staff and our visitors. We have set up a composter to “feed” our garden, which we plant several times a year with the help of the Boys and Girls Club afterschool program. Traditional crops are planted which we hope one day will be large enough in volume to help with the nutritional needs of

  Before the theme parks and the high-rise apartments that guard the beaches, Florida was the wild. That wild still exists today in the Florida Everglades. Quite frankly, there may be no wilderness in America greater than the Everglades. Here crocodiles, alligators and manatees still swim in miles of rivers and streams, and more than 300 species of birds make their nests among the largest mangrove ecosystem in the Western Hemisphere.Known as the "river of grass" the Everglades were the first U.S. national area set aside for its biodiversity. Nine ecosystems, ranging from coral-lined bays to oak tree islands, support a network of plants and animals that can't be found anywhere else on earth. Here are the best ways to explore the Florida Everglades Biking Shark Valley's 15-mile tram and bike loop cuts through a flat-as-plywood freshwater ecosystem of sawgrass marsh and tree islands. No need to worry about hills in the Florida Everglades. At Shark

Spanning over 2,200 acres of the Florida Everglades, Seminole Big Cypress Reservation is the perfect destination for your Everglades Experience. While here, visitors enjoy the untamed landscape that is the Everglades. Whether you are visiting the Ah-Tah-Thi-Ki Seminole Museum or spending an exciting day at Billie Swamp Safari, you will want to be prepared so you can focus on the fun. Four Things to Include in Your Everglades Trip   1. Sun Block South Florida sunshine is abundant year-round, and it’s hot! This means that you and your group will be spending the day outdoors. We recommend bringing sunglasses, a hat, sunscreen, and any other sun protection you need. While some of attractions are covered, you will want to stay protected, and have your only worry be the kind of authentic Seminole cuisine to order at Swamp Water Café. 2. Comfortable Clothing & Shoes You will do lots of walking around and be active at Big

It is no secret that the world’s population of retirees has sharply increased with the Baby Boomer generation. It's a fact, and this surge comes at a time when the economy is moving, investments are growing again, and retirees feel somewhat safe. In short, it’s a good time to do something you’ve always wanted to do! It can also be a scary time for some reaching their senior years because of the rising cost of just maintaining a home let alone paying taxes, utilities, and being an empty nester. More and more, those from this generation are opting to go mortgage-free (or low) and enjoy RV living on the open road. Baby Boomers This name for this generation was given to the population group of Americans born between the years of 1946 and 1965. Post-war optimism, a favorable economy, and a housing boom during this era had much to do with the rise in family

The Florida Everglades is extraordinary feat of nature! Once you come here, it’s easy to see why people come from all over the world to take a journey through the wetlands. With unique vegetation and fantastic wildlife, the Everglades must be seen up close, and in person. But with as much attention as the ecosystem has been getting lately, there’s still much to learn about its contribution to South Florida and the people that live here.

The Florida Everglades is extraordinary feat of nature! Once you come here, it’s easy to see why people come from all over the world to take a journey through the wetlands. With unique vegetation and fantastic wildlife, the Everglades must be seen up close, and in person. But with as much attention as the ecosystem has been getting lately, there’s still much to learn about its contribution to South Florida and the people that live here.

Sea level rise in Florida is a real thing and is currently affecting thousands of significant sites along the coast. One site, Egmont Key, has been investigated by the THPO and may likely be completely underwater within the next 100 years. With the incoming tide of sea level rise, it is imperative that we capture the importance of this site and the gravity it carries in Tribal history.